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I Shall Escape By Dawn, by Hans Christian Danny

Jump Out of Your Skin

Everyone wants out of here. No one wants to stay. It feels like there’s no way out of this scene. Like any place to go has been dictated in advance. Eyes scan a passage as if under remote control. They’re all sick of their script. They want out of their bodies, these bodies that don’t belong to them, bodies they feel trapped inside. Putting on a uniform seems like a chance to escape. The uniform unburdens them of having to play a self in the wrong world. It constitutes a mask. A serial We, in which everyone is like everyone else, steps in for The Individual. Within this We, an idea opens up, that of an outburst which crosses the line—if only to turn into a monster, then so be it.It’s better than staying where life feels glutinous and brutal after half a century of postmodern self-differentiation which has left hardly any choice but to buy the right shoes. More than anything, the care of the self feeds isolation. No one would want to keep living like that. The outburst smashes windowpanes. One shop after the next gets raided. No more picking out shoes, seeking to refine an absurd self-image, just haul them off in indiscriminate piles. “It was the best day of all time,” those hours during which she evaded the pressure of subjectivation and became one with an anonymized mass, unchained behind the mask, consecrating herself to reckless destruction. Why doesn’t everyone buck command and take off? It’s incomprehensible. But the count of outbursts, derailments, strategic emulations, and wild strikes is growing steadily. The abundance of disruptive scenarios has the air of a transitional phase. A lot of people talk like it’s a catastrophe. But why, actually? These outbursts are pulsating with life. They don’t necessarily look pretty, but they’re still a step up from moaning about not having seen or done anything. Maybe it’s not hard at all to go wherever you want without knowing where that is.
Go into the garden.

The Happy Inn, by Priya Shetty

As she is rounding off her six months’ Residence Programme in Wiels, Institution of Contemporary Art in Brussels, Sharon Van Overmeiren’s (°1985, Antwerp, Belgium) research focuses on the significance and the common lineage of objects displayed in various compositions, in particular the relationship between objects and their natural, metaphysical intersect, where objects are transformed into sculptures and identified as functional entities.
The common man has a voice in “The Happy Inn”, where existential issues are being examined and underlying humour is lurking right around the corner. Science, education, knowledge, justification, logic, truth, beliefs and the unknown are just a few examples of topics that are being questioned and compared to one another. The functioning of the human mind as an inevitable mechanism that connects past, present and future is a recurring subject in Van Overmeiren’s practice, which she explores not only by using found footage but that she manipulates and reshapes through various mediums such as ceramic sculptures, video, drawings and installations.
The universe of all these compounded objects emerges from the artist’s mindset and they are assembled in an ordered system resembling a matrix. The elements or entries she alludes to in the Happy Inn refer to mental models that are inhabited by odd creatures.
Van Overmeiren creates various possibilities for different kinds of perception by creating and mixing different moods and states of mind. In her sculptural work physical objects appear to exist in novel contexts or settings. Do artefacts need to be optimistic? It is a fairly complex task to try and figure out where the optimism may lie, as the object or work of art can be perceived as disturbing but at the same time transmit a positive and exhilarating effect.

Sharon Van Overmeiren’s has a background in Visual Arts, with a specialization in Sculpture, at the Sint-Lukas School of Arts in Brussels (2008 – 2009), where exploration of spatiality and three-dimensionality combined with a variety of materials and working methods were introduced.
Ultimately adopting a more experimental approach to the tradition of sculpture, she completed her Masters degree In Situ3 at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts Antwerp (2009 – 2013). During the same period she developed a particular interest in Scenography, which she pursued parallel with liberal arts studies In Situ3. At the previous edition of Art Brussels (2015), the multidisciplinary artist participated in an exhibition project entitled «120 Minutes », a performative sculpture in the shape of an exhibition project. In 2015 Van Overmeiren presented an installation which she baptized « Shuffle Woe » and that consisted of a wooden wall- sized futuristic display case, ceramic pastel-coloured lustrous objects, a sound sculpture and a video projection accompanied by geometric sculptures – in her first solo show at Annie Gentils Gallery in Antwerp. Group exhibitions include « De Vierkantigste rechthoek » (2014) at Kunsthal KAdE Amersfoort and « Who’s Next » (2009) curated by Belgian painter Koen van den Broek. Van Overmeiren received the first prize for LabO, a multidisciplinary arts project initiated by ChampdAction and deSingel that was shown in a presentation entitled « Time Canvas » (2013) at M HKA, Museum of Contemporary Art in Antwerp. « Ignorance is Strength » (2014), an installation created for the display of Hunting & Collecting in Brussels, was a collaboration between the artist Filip Vervaet and Van Overmeiren. The objects in the installation were displayed in a certain scenography, with an image of utopia in a mythical rendering, while clues hinted at a political critique.

Sharon Van Overmeiren (b.1985, lives and works in Belgium) makes, in her own words, ‘fictional sculptures’. She finds it difficult to qualify them as fully autonomous pieces, given that at any moment they may cease to exist in their current form of presentation. On a second level, this choice of wording refers to how she lends a voice to her sculptures; by providing them with a scenario based on found stories, taken from life or literature, combined with her own sense of how we are out of touch with the multiple objects that surround us.

The sculptures make their appearance as ‘props’ in a composition, installation or drawing, or as protagonists of a video or audio piece. In no small part, these works deal with the growing inability of the human mind to describe and experience ‘things’ beyond its own desires.

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